Gardening · Home & Garden · Household · Uncategorized

Freezing Sugar Snap Peas

Every year, at some point, we become overrun with vegetables from our garden. We can only eat so many at a time! We have begun to get to that point now with our sugar snap peas. So, when we get to this point, I begin to freeze some of the peas so that we have them to enjoy later on.

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Snap peas are actually fairly simple to freeze. It takes a few steps and a little work, but it is not difficult to do.

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The first thing I did was pick the peas, cut the ends off, and rinsed them in cold water.

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I then brought a pot of water to a boil. While the water was coming to a boil, I filled a bowl with ice water. For larger batches of vegetables, I sometimes just fill the kitchen sink with ice water, but for this amount of peas, a bowl works fine.

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Once the water was boiling, I grabbed a big handful of snap peas and put them in the water. If the water continues to boil, I set the stove timer for 2 minutes. If the water stops boiling when I put the peas in, I wait until the water begins to boil again to set the timer. I try to put smaller amounts of peas in at a time so that the water boils continuously.  I love the bright color green the peas turn while they are in the boiling water!

 

At the end of the two minutes, I scooped the peas out of the water using a metal strainer basket with a handle and put them right into the ice water. The peas should remain in the ice water for at least two minutes.

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While the first batch of peas were sitting in the ice bath, I brought the water on the stove back up to a boil (if it wasn’t already). I put another large handful of peas in, and began the cycle all over again.

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Once the first batch of peas have been in the ice water for a few minutes or so and the next bunch of peas were boiling, I took the peas out of the ice bath and laid them in a single layer on a towel to dry.

When the second batch of peas had boiled for two minutes, I took them out and put them in the ice bath. And so the cycle continues!

If at any point the ice bath begins to get a little warmer than I would like, I just add more ice. (That is an easy fix!)

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Once all of the peas have had time to air dry, I placed them on a baking sheet in a single layer (or as close to a single layer as I can get them), and then took it to the freezer. This gives each pod the opportunity to freeze individually, as opposed to just putting them all in a bag and they freeze in a giant, unmanageable clump. Yes, I have done that!

I left the peas in the freezer for about 5 hours, giving them enough time to freeze.

 

Once the peas were frozen individually, I used a spatula to scoop the peas into a freezer Ziploc bag. I did my best to squeeze as much air out of the bags as possible.  I labeled them with the contents and the date, and then placed them back in the freezer.  Since one bag is only half filled, I will add to it when I freeze my next batch of peas.

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That’s it! That’s all there is to it! It takes a little bit of time, but it is really quite simple to do! And now, we can enjoy sugar snap peas all year long!

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